Mechanisms that Alternatively Activated Macrophages Exploit to Enhance Ovarian Cancer Progression – Pamela Kreeger, PhD

Mechanisms that Alternatively Activated Macrophages Exploit to Enhance Ovarian Cancer Progression – Pamela Kreeger, PhD

When:
December 20, 2017 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
2017-12-20T12:00:00-06:00
2017-12-20T13:00:00-06:00
Where:
Froedtert - Dynacare Lab Building, 2nd floor, Ob-Gyn conference room #252
Contact:
Taylor Anglin
(414) 805-5695

Presented by

Pamela Kreeger, PhD

Pamela Kreeger, PhD
Associate Professor
Vilas Associate
Dept. of Biomedical Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Dept. of Cell and Regenerative Biology,
Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology
University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

Dr. Kreeger’s Research

Dr. Kreeger is working to develop a novel model of the retinal microenvironment to determine the impact of microenvironmental properties and cell-cell interactions on angiogenesis in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Her background is in developing in vitro models of tissues (including her graduate work developing a system for the ovarian follicle and work from her independent lab to develop systems to study cell-cell interactions in ovarian cancer) and utilizing systems biology modeling to study cell behavior. Her current AMD-related project is in collaboration with Kristyn Masters (BME) and will involve interactions with McPherson ERI colleagues Jeremy Rogers and David Gamm.

About the Kreeger lab

The Kreeger lab utilizes systems biology and tissue engineering to analyze cellular behavior in a variety of biological contexts. We utilize an iterative approach, where we develop model culture systems that allow us to study a disease in a controlled environment, use high-throughput experimental methods to gather information about the cellular signaling network and cellular responses, and employ computational models to interpret the data. Ultimately, our models will be utilized to identify new drug targets, match patients to the most effective drugs, and identify methods to direct cellular behavior.

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